Russian Mafia Arrests – 6.9.17

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9:59 AM 6/9/2017

Russian Mafia Arrests – 6.9.17

US Police Arrests 33 including 15 Georgians for Various Crimes – Georgia Today on the Web
Russian mafia in US: Razhden Shulaya to face 65-year-imprisonment, 2 killers of gang to be sentenced for life
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Russian ‘thief-in-law’ arrested in Las Vegas, faces multiple charges – Las Vegas Review-Journal
Russian ‘thief-in-law’ arrested in Las Vegas, faces multiple charges – Las Vegas Review-Journal
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Russian ‘thief-in-law’ arrested in Las Vegas, faces multiple charges – Las Vegas Review-Journal

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Federal prosecutors on Wednesday announced racketeering charges against more than two dozen reputed Russian mobsters and associates, including Razhden Shulaya, the alleged leader of a Soviet mafia syndicate who is accused of running gambling, stolen goods and protection rackets in several states across the country.

Shulaya was arrested in Las Vegas Wednesday morning, and appeared in federal court for a brief hearing later in the day. U.S. Magistrate Judge George Foley ordered his transfer to New York, where the case is being prosecuted.

“I understand what they accused me of, but I just don’t understand why,” the 40-year-old Shulaya, a Russian national, said through a translator after the judge asked him if he understood the charges contained in the seven-count indictment against him and other members of the New York City-based “Shulaya Enterprise.”

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Authorities describe Shulaya as a “vor v zakone,” a Russian term for “thief-in-law” that refers to an elite order of Soviet criminals. The indictment provides an image of a powerful crime boss who collected “tribute payments” from loyal subordinates and violently retaliated against lower-ranking criminals who failed to pay up.

The Shulaya Enterprise’s alleged crimes were detailed in three indictments unsealed in New York City. Among the more shocking allegations is a charge that the group used a female member to seduce men, incapacitate them with gas and rob them. The indictments also included accusations of traditional mob crimes such as illegal gambling, cigarette trafficking, bribery, extortion and credit card fraud — along with more unusual charges, such as the theft of a cargo shipment of 10,000 pounds of chocolate. A related criminal complaint, in which Shulaya was not charged, focused on a murder-for-hire conspiracy.

‘Extremely violent history’

The reputed “vor,” who was taken into federal custody after his arrest, displayed little emotion during his afternoon court hearing Wednesday. He sat at the defense table, shrugging occasionally and sliding his feet in and out of sandals while the judge addressed him. Authorities say he used his substantial criminal underworld influence to run illegal operations in several states, including Nevada, Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and New York.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Patrick Burns described Shulaya as a “high-level member of Russia’s organized crime mafia” with an “extremely violent history.” Russian authorities, Burns said, had a notice out for his arrest on kidnap-for-ransom charges. Shulaya, however, is expected to remain in this country for the immediate future as the United States does not have an extradition treaty with Russia.

In a statement released Wednesday, acting Manhattan U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim, who is overseeing prosecution, accused the Shulaya Enterprise of engaging in a “panoply of crimes around the country.” Kim said the case represented “one of the first federal racketeering charges ever brought against a Russian ‘vor.’”

‘Dizzying array’ of criminal schemes

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The prosecutor accused Shulaya and his associates of a “dizzying array” of criminal schemes, which included an illegal poker business the group ran in Brooklyn. Shulaya and one of the other defendants also are accused of investing in an after-hours club in New York, and then bribing local law enforcement officers so they could use the business to sell drugs to customers.

The indictment provides few details about the extent of criminal activity in Las Vegas, but it suggests that it involved the use of counterfeit credit cards and identity theft.

Those indicted Wednesday also were accused of trying to defraud casinos in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. According to the indictment, federal investigators intercepted a telephone call between Shulaya and one of his co-defendants this year in which the two men discussed the operability of devices that could predict the behavior of electronic slot machines at casinos.

Authorities say Shulaya and others charged in the case sent portions of their mob profits back to mafia members and associates in Russia, Georgia and Ukraine.

The reputed gangsters’ efforts to avoid prosecution also were detailed in the indictment, which says members of the criminal enterprise spoke in coded language and used encrypted communication to thwart law enforcement. Meanwhile, federal investigators wiretapped phone conversations and gathered information from confidential informants, who negotiated the sale of stolen jewelry and other goods from members of the conspiracy.

“The Thief-in-Law allegedly established an extensive cross-country criminal enterprise from Brighton Beach to Las Vegas that engaged in bribes, gambling, and murder for hire,” New York Police Department Commissioner James P. O’Neill said in a statement released Wednesday.

Thirty-three defendants were charged in the indictments, 27 of whom are said to be associated with the racketeering enterprise led by Shulaya. Twenty-three of the defendants are in federal custody.

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Contact Jenny Wilson at <a href=”mailto:jenwilson@reviewjournal.com”>jenwilson@reviewjournal.com</a> or 702-384-8710. Follow @jennydwilson on Twitter.

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Razhden Shulaya to face 65-year-imprisonment, 2 killers of gang to be sentenced for life

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Two killers of the gang might face life sentence.+

On several counts 40-year-old thief in law Razhden Shulaya also known as Razhden Pitersky, Roma and Brat, can be sentenced to 65 years in the United States, the US Department of Justice said. +

In addition, for the committed crimes the thief in law will face up a fine of not less than $1.250.000. +

Other members of the criminal group, who were charged yesterday by the Prosecutor’s Office of the Southern District of New York, are threatened with various terms of imprisonment – from 25 to life imprisonment. In particular, the members of the Razhden Pitersky gang Nikoloz Dzhikia and Bakai Marat-Uulu can be sentenced to life imprisonment for contract killings. +

Earlier it became known that in the state of New York, 33 representatives of the Russian mafia, led by thief in law  Razhden Shulaya  were charged. 27 of them were detained, five more are still on the wanted list. +

After the names of the detainees were published, it became clear that 15 of them were Georgian citizens, including two world-famous athletes – World Boxing Champion Avtandil Khurtsidze and MMA fighter Levan Makashvili, who competed in UFC championships. +

Khurtsidze commented on his arrest on Facebook, describing what happened as a “big misunderstanding.” He noted that he arrived in New York to prepare for a fight with Billy Joe Saunders, which, is to be held only on July 8, and in London. +

Depending on the role of each, members of the OCG are accused of various crimes – from smuggling cigarettes, storing drugs, racketeering, selling stolen goods and giving bribes, to with theft of large loads, organizing illegal gambling, storing and selling weapons, robberies, drug trafficking and contract killings. +

Our
notes

Razhden Shulaya, 40, is a Georgian thief in law, who was thief-crowned at the age of 36 at a Cyprus meeting in May 2013. Other criminals that got their crowns that day are Dato Krasnodarsky (later discrowned), Bondo Kazakhstansky, Goga Kutaissky, Ilo Kaliningradsky and Artem Saratovsky. Those who approved the “coronation” were Antik, Koka, Matevich, Givi Tbilissky, Merab Sukhumsky, Tsripa Kutaissky, Robinson, Takhi, Osetrina and some others. According to the investigation, the criminal syndicate is involved in the organization of illegal poker clubs in the New York area where immigrants from the post-Soviet states live and in a fraud on casino slot machines using electronic hacking devices in Atlantic City (New Jersey) and Philadelphia (Pennsylvania).

ragd2.jpgAccording to the US law enforcement agencies, thief in law Razhden Shulaya was the person that created the criminal enterprise accused of a number of crimes. Shulaya has been living in New Jersey lately, and the other mobsters resided mainly in New York’s Brooklyn, Manhattan and Queens. +

The district attorney also mentioned the extensive ties Shulaya had in the underworld that contributed to establishing strong links with the criminals of post-Soviet countries like Georgia, Ukraine and Russia. +

Most of the gang members were born in the Soviet Union, traveled regularly to its former states and contacted individuals associated with criminal activity of the gang, the US Justice Department said. +

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US Police Arrests 33 including 15 Georgians for Various Crimes

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Thirty-three suspected members of an organized Russian crime syndicate were arrested with a variety of charges, including racketeering, fraud, narcotics, firearms, and stolen property offenses.

The information was released by the United States (US) Department of Justice on Thursday.

The Justice Department reports that 27 out of the detained are associated with a nationwide racketeering enterprise led by Razhden Shulaya and Zurab Dzhanashvili and are charged in United States v. Razhden Shulaya, et al. (the “Shulaya Indictment”) and an accompanying superseding indictment.

The US Attorney’s Office of Southern District of New York says that Charged Defendants Include Alleged “Vor” or “Thief-In-Law” of a Russian and Georgian Criminal Enterprise.

“We have charged 33 members and associates of a Russian organized crime syndicate allegedly engaging a panoply of crimes around the country. The indictments include charges against the alleged head of this national criminal enterprise, one of the first federal racketeering charges ever brought against a Russian ‘vor.’ The dizzying array of criminal schemes committed by this organized crime syndicate allegedly include a murder-for-hire conspiracy, a plot to rob victims by seducing and drugging them with chloroform, the theft of cargo shipments containing over 10,000 pounds of chocolate, and a fraud on casino slot machines using electronic hacking devices,” the statement reads.

The office says that the charges include:

  • Theft of cargo shipments, including approximately 10,000 pounds of chocolate confections.
  • Having females seduce men, incapacitate them with gas, and then rob them.
  • Selling untaxed cigarettes.
  • Scheming to pay bribes for law-enforcement officials.
  • Operating illegal poker businesses and extorting gamblers who became indebted to them.
  • Plans to defraud casinos in Atlantic City and Philadelphia by using electronics that could predict the behavior of slot machines.

According to the allegations in the Indictments and complaint unsealed in Manhattan federal court, Shulaya Enterprise was an organized criminal group operating under the direction and protection of RAZHDEN SHULAYA a/k/a “Brother,” a/k/a “Roma,” a “vor v zakone” or “vor,” which are Russian phrases translated roughly as “thief-in-law” or “thief.”

“Most members and associates of the Shulaya Enterprise were born in the former Soviet Union and many maintained substantial ties to Georgia, the Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, including regular travel to those countries, communication with associates in those countries, and the transfer of criminal proceeds to individuals in those countries,” the statement reads.

By Thea Morrison

09 June 2017 11:59

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russian organized crime in us – Google News: US Police Arrests 33 including 15 Georgians for Various Crimes – Georgia Today

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Georgia Today
US Police Arrests 33 including 15 Georgians for Various Crimes
Georgia Today
Thirty-three suspected members of an organized Russian crime syndicate were arrested with a variety of charges, including racketeering, fraud, narcotics, firearms, and stolen property offenses. The information was released by the United States (US) …

russian organized crime in us – Google News

russia as mafia state – Google News: Russian mafia in US: Razhden Shulaya to face 65-year-imprisonment, 2 killers of gang to be sentenced for life – https://en.crimerussia.com/

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https://en.crimerussia.com/
Russian mafia in US: Razhden Shulaya to face 65-year-imprisonment, 2 killers of gang to be sentenced for life
https://en.crimerussia.com/
On several counts 40-year-old thief in law Razhden Shulaya also known as Razhden Pitersky, Roma and Brat, can be sentenced to 65 years in the United States, the US Department of Justice said. +. In addition, for the committed crimes the thief in law

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russia as mafia state – Google News

1. VIDEO NEWS from mikenova (66 sites): AssociatedPress’s YouTube Videos: AP Top Stories June 9 A

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From: AssociatedPress
Duration: 00:59

Here’s the latest for Friday, June 9th: Conservatives lose majority in UK vote; Justice Dept. says Sessions recused self from Russia probe because he was in Trump campaign; Accused NSA Leaker denied bond; Pickup truck hits two DC police officers…


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