8:43 AM 10/23/2017 – Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash – NYT | The Early Edition: October 23, 2017

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Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:23:29 +0200

The Showboats By Michael Novakhov
1. News in Photos from mikenova (4 sites)
WSJ.com: World News: Swindling of Mecca Pilgrims Turns Political in Indonesia

A high-profile case of alleged fraud in Indonesias pilgrimage-to-Mecca industry has provided political ammunition to hard-line Islamists gaining sway in the country and challenging President Joko Widodo.

WSJ.com: World News

 

Saved Stories – None
fbi statistics – Google Search
James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty
Andrew Weissmann, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics
Christopher Wray – Google News: New FBI Director Touts Importance of Partnerships With Local Police at IACP 2017 – Officer.com (press release) (blog)
FBI News Review: 10:12 AM 10/22/2017 FBI: Did Russias Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election?
james b. comey – Google News: James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty – Newsweek
The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 12:12 PM 10/22/2017: On Khazarian Mafia
The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 12:29 PM 10/22/2017 All Recent Posts on G+
The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 1:57 PM 10/22/2017 Graham: Trump Administration Has a Blind Spot on Russia
mueller – Google News: Trump says he hasn’t been asked to do Mueller interview – CNN
mueller – Google News: Christopher Wray, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics – Washington Times
Christopher Wray – Google News: Christopher Wray, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics – Washington Times
Christopher Wray – Google News: FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’ – PennLive.com
james b. comey – Google News: Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash – New York Times
FBI News Review: 5:45 PM 10/22/2017 FBI directors speech
5:45 PM 10/22/2017 FBI directors speech
fbi – Google News: FBI watched, then acted as Russian spy moved closer to Hillary Clinton – The Hill
fbi – Google News: Former FBI Director James Comey sparks 2020 rumors here’s why – TheBlaze.com
Christopher Wray – Google News: FBI couldn’t access nearly 7K devices because of encryption – Las Vegas Sun
Christopher Wray – Google News: Wray seeking to bring ‘calm and stability’ to FBI – CNN
fbi – Google News: ‘Mindhunter’ Cast on the FBI’s Obsession, Getting Personal, and the Moments That Most Got Under Their Skin – Variety

 

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Story image for fbi statistics from Detroit Free Press

Detroit Free Press

FBI Releases 2016 Crime Statistics

Federal Bureau of Investigation (press release) (blog)Sep 25, 2017
The 2016 statistics show the estimated rate of violent crime was 386.3 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants, and the estimated rate of property …
Database: 2016 FBI crime statistics by US city
Detroit Free PressSep 25, 2017
FBI Crime Statistics
Valley News LiveSep 25, 2017
Violent crimes and murders increased in 2016 for a second …
In-DepthWashington PostSep 25, 2017
fbi statistics underreporting of crimes by informants – Google Search

Story image for fbi statistics underreporting of crimes by informants from Gizmodo Australia

FBI Severely Underreported How Many Times It Authorised …

Gizmodo AustraliaSep 20, 2017
FBI Severely Underreported How Many Times It Authorised Informants … Otherwise, authorised informants may engage in criminal activity to maintain … The yearly average of otherwise illegal activities reported between 2011 …
FBI Severely Underreported How Many Times It Authorised Informants To Break The Law

This year, the FBI appears to for the first time have overlooked a reporting obligation established by the US Attorney General’s office, and in doing so, the bureau appears to have greatly low-balled the total number of times it authorised confidential informants to engage in criminal activity last year.

Photo: AP

As a consequence, the bureau did something else that’s new: It revealed the number of times it gave informants permission to engage in serious criminal activity. And lacking an official explanation so far, our running theory is that a clerical error could be to blame.

Each year, the FBI Directorate of Intelligence compiles a report on what the US Justice Department calls “otherwise illegal activity” (OIA) — activity FBI informants are involved in that would otherwise be illegal, had the FBI not given them permission to do it.

There are some crimes the FBI is forbidden from authorising. Those include acts of violence and obstruction of justice (that is, witness tampering, entrapment, fabrication of evidence). Its informants are also prohibited from “initiating or instigating” a plan to commit a crime. Otherwise, authorised informants may engage in criminal activity to maintain cover and provide the bureau with intelligence on other, presumably worse criminals, so long as certain protocols are observed.

These protocols are explained in a document known as The Attorney General’s Guidelines Regarding the Use of Confidential Informants. Since at least 2006, this document has included a number of record-keeping requirements. One is that the FBI must submit an annual report to the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and National Security Division describing “the total number of times each FBI Field Office authorised a Confidential Human Source to engage in Otherwise Illegal Activity (OIA), and the overall nationwide totals”.

These OIA reports are traditionally drafted between January and March each year. The yearly average of otherwise illegal activities reported between 2011 and 2015 is around 5600. In 2012, the number peaked at 5939. The lowest number was in 2015, when the FBI only reported only 5261 authorisations for criminal activity, according to new records obtained by Gizmodo under the Freedom of Information Act.

The authorisations for OIA must be renewed every three months, so technically it’s possible each individual authorisation covers a multitude of criminal acts. In other words, the figures don’t actually represent crimes, but 90-day windows in which informants are allowed to break the law.

The 2016 report, which was compiled by the assistant director of the FBI Intelligence Directorate, appears wildly inaccurate at first blush. The number of authorisations for criminal activity reported to the Justice Department this March was only 381.

Here’s what that looks like compared to the previous five years:

What?

Either the FBI has dramatically curtailed how often it allows informants to break the law, or something isn’t right here. Here’s a closer look at the actual numbers, side by side:

If you picked “something isn’t right here,” then you are correct. It turns out the FBI actually failed to report any entire tier’s worth of criminal activity, thereby significantly reducing the overall number of authorised crimes it reported. That’s about a 93 per cent drop in the OIA total.

Authorised crimes by informants are divided into what the FBI calls “tiers”. Tier 1 activities are more serious types of crimes, importing huge amounts of heroin for instance; whereas Tier 2 includes basically everything else, down to shoplifting.

Here’s an incomplete list of what’s considered Tier 1 activity:

  1. The commission, or the significant risk of the commission, of any act of violence by a person or persons other than the Confidential Human Source;
  2. Corrupt conduct, or the significant risk of corrupt conduct, by an elected public official or a public official in a high-level decision-making or sensitive position in federal, state or local government;
  3. Manufacturing, importing, exporting, possession or trafficking of controlled substances in a quantity equal to or exceeding those quantities specified in United States Sentencing Guidelines § 2D1.1(c)(1)(90kg of heroin, 450kg of cocaine, 90,000kg of marijuana, and so on);
  4. Financial loss, or the significant risk of financial loss, in an amount equal to or exceeding those amounts specified in United States Sentencing Guidelines § 2B1.1(b)(1)(I) ($US1.5 million [$1.9 million].)

Conversely, Tier 2 activity is simply defined as “any other activity that would constitute a misdemeanour or felony under federal, state, or local law if engaged in by a person acting without authorization”.

Most of the time, we can’t tell the difference between the two. For reporting purposes, Tier 1 and 2 criminal activity is usually bundled into a single total. And that means that in 2015 the FBI may have authorised its informants to commit 5261 misdemeanours for all we know.

But this year, something different happened. Tier 2 wasn’t included. And now we know that in 2016, at least 381 times, the FBI authorised its informants to engage in some really serious criminal activity. Whether that was commissioning an act of violence by another person or manufacturing a truckload of cocaine, we can’t be sure.

So, how did this happen exactly? Was it a clerical error or did the FBI do this on purpose? Did the Attorney General’s office issue new guidelines? We’re not entirely sure. The US Justice Department declined to comment, even though it sets the rules and, by all appearances, its National Security Division was robbed of an important statistic. The FBI told Gizmodo yesterday that it was working on an answer.

James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty

James O’Keefe wants you to think that he’s a journalist. That the undercover videos shot for his Project Veritas are all that keep rampant liberalism from running roughshod over the republic. Freedom has manifold enemies, from National Public Radio to Planned Parenthood, and the only way to hold them in check is to secretly record members of these flagrantly liberal organizations, then edit the videos in such a way as to make it seem that those organizations sell baby organs, celebrate prostitution and send conservatives unwanted subscriptions to The Nation.

The final step is to promulgate these videos to right-wing organizations like Breitbart and Fox News, where the editors believe exactly what O’Keefe does about the Clintons and CNN and are therefore not going to be bothered by an organization that, while it claims to be journalistic in nature, is a fairly accurate approximation of Soviet propaganda. (I grew up in the Soviet Union, so this is not an exaggeration.)

Project Veritas

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Speaking of our comrades in the Kremlin: O’Keefe’s latest investigation is called “American Pravda, ” and it purports to show the rampant bias of The New York Times, which hates President Donald Trump so much it invited him to an editorial meeting shortly after his electoral victory. He, in turn, despises the Times, even if he does seem to talk to White House reporter Maggie Haberman more often than I talk to my mom.

O’Keefe opens the first video with himself standing in front of a background that shows the paper’s Times Square headquarters. “Fake news,” those are the first two words O’Keefe says in his narration, in the same sanctimonious tone that informs all of his work. He then declares that he has evidence that the Times, which claims to be “completely objective” — does it, though? does any outlet? —is, in fact, rife with political bias.

What follows is astonishing stuff: executive editor Dean Baquet taking dictation on a frontpage story from Hillary Clinton; national editor Marc Lacey telling a reporter to “stuff more fake news” into an investigation into the finances of Trump. The final video, and the most shocking of all, has liberal financier George Soros in the newsroom all alone, putting together the Sunday paper.

Sorry. Had to do that. O’Keefe’s videos contain nothing remotely that flagrant. The crux of this undercooked nothingburger of an exposé involves a tedious series of conversations —covertly filmed, per Project Veritas scruples— between a female “journalist” and Nicholas Dudich, a junior video editor at the Times. Dudich seems to have as much sway with the paper’s editors as I do with the front office of the Knicks.

O’Keefe lucked out in that Dudich is self-important and dishonest, claiming that former FBI Director James B. Comey is his godfather and intimating that he may have worked for the FBI. He also calls himself a “gatekeeper” at the newspaper. O’Keefe wants to paint him as a liberal ideologue, but Dudich comes across as a doofus.

Dudich is identified in the video as an “audience strategy editor.” That suggests a concentration on engagement with readers on social media platforms, though he intimates that he has something to do with video, too. Whatever the case, he is not dictating news coverage, pulling reporters off the business desk and commissioning Trump hatchet jobs. There are 3,700 employees at the Times. That one of them would designate himself the paper’s “gatekeeper” is a pretty good indication of his self-importance and cluelessness.

Project Veritas

If O’Keefe had any intellectual dignity, he would be honest about the above. Spoiler alert: He doesn’t because he has none.

Instead, O’Keefe hypes up Dudich’s claims, only because they are a convenient weapon with which to bludgeon the Times. “Does the Times lack journalistic integrity altogether?” O’Keefe wonders, in a question all the more ironic because of the self-importance with which it is posed.

The acute irony of O’Keefe’s defense of journalistic standards via the violation of every single one of them comes at the beginning of the third video (Dudich gets two videos to himself). There, two Project Veritas “reporters” accost Times homepage editor Desiree Shoe at a bar in London, where she works.

“I am speaking off the record,” Shoe says at the beginning of the recording. She doesn’t know she is being filmed, of course, but she is savvy enough to indicate that she is now an ordinary person, a woman having a drink at a bar, not an emissary of the New York Times. “Off the record” are sacred words in journalism, and that O’Keefe would violate them —and then brag about it by replaying that statement throughout the clip— should tell you everything you need to know about what he’s after.

Project Veritas

In the end, what he gets is not much. Shoe acknowledges that it is difficult to write about a president who is “apologetic toward white supremacists” in an objective manner. And yet, she might have noted the Times did exactly that in its news coverage. It was Trump who called the neo-Nazis “very fine people,” not the Times. You’ve got to wonder: By “bias,” does O’Keefe simply mean coverage that is unflattering to Trump? If so, then censorship is what he’s truly after.

Shoe does call Trump an “oblivious idiot.” How does this enter into everyday work at the Times? Considering that Shoe is an obviously thoughtful young woman who has made clear she is speaking only for herself, I am guessing that she, like most Times journalists, can keep her opinions at bay unless they are, for some reason, asked for. Anyone intelligent enough to write for the national paper of record is going to have bias, which is to say thoughts. The question isn’t whether journalists have bias but whether they also have restraint. I don’t, clearly, but that’s only because I’ve spent the evening watching James O’Keefe videos.

Remember, also, that Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Trump a “fucking moron.” The veracity of that assertion aside, I wonder if that makes the former Exxon chief from Texas a member of the clueless liberal elite. Or if he, like everyone else, is doing the best he can, trying to be a human and a professional in a bewildering world that offers little respite. We can’t all be the paragons of virtue that is James O’Keefe.

The fourth O’Keefe video is the most preposterous of all. The subject is Todd Gordon, an information technology consultant who has apparently done work for the Times for 17 years (he owns his own company, suggesting that the work is contractual.) Having appointed himself the paper’s ombudsman, he offers profound insight into how the hundreds of journalists at the Times all see Trump: “They hate him like the plague, dude.”

Project Veritas

It is unclear how Gordon knows this. Project Veritas doesn’t bother asking. Like a Stalinist show trial, this was an investigation whose conclusions were never in doubt.

The goal of all O’Keefe’s fundraising, not truth-telling. Conservative funders (including the Trump Organization) have allowed O’Keefe to prosper. In return, he must tell these funders what they want to hear. And no sound is sweeter to their ears than liberal bias coming from the New York Timesnewsroom.

But what is bias, anyway? O’Keefe hasn’t anywhere near the intellectual curiosity to ask that question. For all his certainty about the newspaper’s liberal skew, he doesn’t dissect a single Times story to lay bare its anti-Trump bias. Are there questions to be asked about coverage of this administration? Absolutely. It’s a shame that O’Keefe doesn’t ask a single one.

O’Keefe probably knows, and probably doesn’t care, that he is doing an enormous disservice to the American public. It is no accident that polls show an erosion of trust in journalists in the last several years. That’s largely the result of attacks by Trump and his abettors in the right-wing media, especially Fox News and Breitbart, both of which have eagerly promulgated O’Keefe’s shoddy, unethical investigations.

Distrust in the media is necessary to the far right because journalists are charged with telling the truth. Sometimes we fail, just as doctors sometimes have patients die on the operating table. And there are fundamentally unscrupulous journalists. But like fundamentally unscrupulous doctors, they are pretty darn rare. Most journalists I now wake up wanting to tell the truth. Maybe about Ariana Grande, maybe about the economy of Argentina. As long as the words are set down with dignity, it does not matter.

Truth is only a problem if your agenda is untruth: about climate change, crime in the inner cities, taxes, health care, equal pay, contraception. In that case, you need to malign the truth-tellers, to make them seem like sniveling liars. That way, nobody will believe them. That’s the ultimate irony about O’Keefe’s “American Pravda” series, which borrows its name from the dogged Kremlin mouthpiece of Soviet times. He is the one who can tolerate no dissent from the official line, who treats any criticism of the president as an unforgivable offense. His fealty, like that of Stalin’s enablers in the press, has nothing to do with conviction. It is self-interest laced with just enough outrage to make it seem genuine.

“Honestly, it’s worrying,” O’Keefe says.

It honestly is.

Andrew Weissmann, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics

FBI Director Christopher A. Wray was an assistant attorney general in 2004 when he heaped praise on an ambitious Mafia-tested prosecutor while promoting him to the top of the Justice Department’s high-profile Enron task force.

Mr. Wray specifically lauded Andrew Weissmann for obtaining convictions against two Enron clients: accounting giant Arthur Andersen and executives at banking dynamo Merrill Lynch.

Andersen was finished as a company; four Merrill executives went to prison.

Today, Mr. Weissmann stands as special counsel Robert Mueller’s top gun in a squadron of nearly 20 prosecutors and scores of FBI agents delving into TrumpRussiaMr. Weissmann is leading the probe into the biggest target to date, Paul Manafort, President Trump’s onetime campaign manager.

How Mr. Weissmann operated over a decade ago offers possible glimpses at how he carries out orders today from his longtime mentor, Mr. Mueller.

He rode into Texas from New York City in 2002 fresh from putting a number of Mafiosos in prison.


SEE ALSO: Complaints against Weissmann go nowhere


By the time he left in 2005, he had rung up some impressive numbers, such as 22 guilty pleas and millions of dollars in restitution. But he also suffered historic courtroom losses. And how he won and how he lost is still the subject of bitter comments from his adversaries in Houston.

“Do not misunderstand my disdain for him with ineffectiveness or something not to be concerned with,” said Dan Cogdell, who represented three Enron defendants. “He’s a formable prosecutor. If I’m Donald Trump and I know the backstory of Andrew Weissmann, it’s going to concern me. There is no question about it.”

The backstory: Defense attorneys say Mr. Weissmann bent or broke the rules. As proof, they point to appeals court decisions, exhibits and witness statements.

They say he intimidated witnesses by threatening indictments, created crimes that did not exist and, in one case, withheld evidence that could have aided the accused. At one hearing, an incredulous district court judge looked down at an Enron defendant and told him he was pleading guilty to a wire fraud crime that did not exist.

Weissmann seemed more interested in obtaining convictions than in promoting justice,” said Tom Kirkendall, a Houston lawyer who represented an Enron executive.

Said Mr. Cogdell, a colorful courtroom performer dubbed a “gunslinger” by the local press, “He’s the most aggressive prosecutor I’ve ever been up against. He is, if not win at all cost, he’s win at almost any cost.”

Those convictions for which Mr. Wray offered praise in 2004?

Mr. Weissmann’s cases against Andersen and Merrill Lynch lay in shambles just a few years later.

The Supreme Court, in a 9-0 vote in 2005, overturned the Andersen conviction. A year later, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals erased all the fraud convictions against four Merrill Lynch managers. The jury had acquitted another defendant.

“People went off to prison for a completely phantom of a case,” said Mr. Kirkendall.

Mr. Kirkendall became sort of an unofficial Enron historian. He observed goings-on at the Houston federal courthouse and blogged about what he considered a systematic miscarriage of justice.

The task force, which ultimately would catapult prosecutors to lucrative careers, wanted to win as many convictions as possible. They were prosecuting players in one of the nation’s biggest corporate scandals. Enron bosses falsified balance sheets, inflated earnings and traded stocks with insider knowledge. By 2001, the behemoth went bankrupt. Its stock was worthless.

The Justice Department task force mobilized in 2002 and quickly won convictions. But there were dark sides.

That’s where Sidney Powell enters the picture. The Dallas lawyer took the appeal of a Merrill Lynch figure. She obtained from Justice a batch of task force documents in 2010 that should have been disclosed to trial attorneys years earlier.

The documents began to flow in the aftermath of the Sen. Ted Stevens debacle. Justice prosecutors not connected to the Enron task force deliberately withheld evidence favorable to Stevens. A judge threw out his conviction.

Ms. Powell wrote a 2014 book about the scandals, “Licensed to Lie: Exposing Corruption in the Department of Justice.”

“All of the cases Weissmann pushed to trial were reversed in whole or in part due to some form of his overreaching and abuses,” Ms. Powell told The Washington Times. “The most polite thing the Houston bar said about Weissmann was that he was a madman.”

The special counsel’s office declined to comment to The Times about Mr. Weissmann’s track record.

However, the Justice Department in 2012 and 2013 defended him against ethics complaints and concluded he did not violate the rules.

Given Mr. Weissmann’s long association with Mr. Mueller, who has given him a prominent management role in one of the most important investigations in U.S. history, The Times took a look back at Mr. Weissmann‘s’ 2002-05 Enron task force tenure.

His hardball tactics seem intact today. Within weeks of his arrival in June, the FBI executed a no-knock, predawn raid on Mr. Manafort’s condo. Agents stayed for hours after waking up the target and his wife.

Then a leak appeared in The New York Times. Mr. Mueller had informed Mr. Manafort that he would be indicted. It’s an old Enron tactic: Scare people into talking.

Arthur Anderson

With over 20,000 employees, Andersen stood as one of the country’s most prominent corporate auditors. The Securities and Exchange Commission began investigating Enron, an Andersen client. Auditors started destroying documents.

Mr. Weissmann took the lead in prosecuting Andersen for obstruction of justice in 2002. Andersen’s defense: It followed company policy on when to destroy confidential material.

Convicted at trial, a fatally damaged Andersen appealed. The Supreme Court eventually took the case.

In 2005, the nation’s highest court overturned the conviction in a 9-0 opinion, a devastating judgment that shattered Mr. Weissmann’s showcase.

Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist wrote the opinion, solo — a message of how seriously the high court took the breach.

In essence, Rehnquist said the prosecutor sold the presiding judge on jury instructions that assured conviction.

“Indeed, it is striking how little culpability the instructions required,” Mr. Rehnquist wrote. “For example, the jury was told that, even if [Andersen] honestly and sincerely believed that its conduct was lawful, you may find [Andersen] guilty. The instructions also diluted the meaning of ‘corruptly’ so that it covered innocent conduct.”

Mr. Rehnquist wrote that the government (Mr. Weissmann) insisted, over defense objections, that the word “dishonestly” be excluded from the instructions and that the word “impede” be added.

The chief justice went to the dictionary, read the meaning of “impede” and concluded it was “such innocent conduct” for someone to “impede” the government.

Said Ms. Powell, “Weissmann indicted them for conduct that was not criminal, and he took criminal intent out of the jury instructions that he then persuaded the judge to give.”

With a lack of sustaining clients, a mortally wounded Andersen put out a statement.

“We are very pleased with the Supreme Court’s decision, which acknowledges the fundamental injustice that has been done to Arthur Andersen and its former personnel and retirees,” it said.

In the end, the George W. Bush Justice Department put out of business a thriving accounting firm whose actions could have been handled in other ways short of felony charges.

Merrill Lynch

It became known as the Nigerian barge case. Mr. Weissmann induced indictments in 2003 against four Merrill Lynch executives, an Enron vice president and an Enron accountant. He contended that Merrill and Enron entered into a sham transaction in 1999. The banker would buy three Enron barge-mounted power generators for $7 million purely to boost the Houston company’s balance sheet — and then Enron would buy them back at a profit.

They were charged under a federal statute that normally requires proof that someone paid a bribe or received kickbacks that sullied the business practices of “honest services.” There were no bribes or kickbacks.

Five were convicted. The accountant — represented by Mr. Cogdell — heard the jury say, “Not guilty.”

Four of them appealed while serving time in prison. In 2006, the 5th Circuit reversed all the fraud charges, leaving just a perjury conviction against one executive, whom Ms. Powell came to represent on appeal.

Again, the problem for Mr. Weissmann was his definition of a crime that greatly relaxed the standard for convictions.

“We reverse the conspiracy and wire-fraud convictions of each of the defendants on the legal ground that the government’s [Weissmann task force] theory of fraud relating to the deprivation of honest services is flawed,” the appeals court said.

The opinion said the scheme may have been unethical but did not violate federal fraud laws. The courtsaid that not all corporate fiduciary lapses are tantamount to crimes.

Attorney Kirkendall said the Enron trials in Houston were held “in a highly inflamed environment.”

“The task force took advantage of that and convicted these men,” he said. “What it caused them and their families, you can just imagine.”

The government did not retry the five on fraud charges.

Concealed evidence

What the Merrill defense attorneys did not know during trial was this: There were favorable witness statements that the prosecution withheld.

In 2010, Justice began releasing confidential Enron task force documents. They showed that Mr. Weissmann’s team provided misleading summaries at trial of raw witness statements to the FBI and to the grand jury.

The disconnect became an issue in the appeal of Ms. Powell’s client, Merrill executive James A. Brown, in the Nigerian barge case. Although his fraud conviction went away, his perjury guilt stuck.

Ms. Powell was particularly struck by this: The government’s summary said a witness, Enron’s Jeffrey McMahon, “does not recall” a barge buyback agreement. In in his actual interview, he said there was no deal. The prosecution badly distorted what he had said, depriving trial attorneys of information that could persuade a jury to acquit. Mr. McMahon was under threat of indictment and did not testify.

The 5th Circuit agreed — to a point.

“Favorable information was plainly suppressed from McMahon’s notes,” the court wrote.

“The McMahon notes contain numerous passages that unequivocally state that it was McMahon’s understanding that there was only a ‘best efforts’ agreement and no ‘promise,’ whereas the government’s disclosure letter says only that McMahon ‘does not recall’ a guaranteed buyback.”

Even worse, Ms. Powell said, the documents showed that Weissmann’s team yellow-highlighted favorable information that it deliberately withheld from its proffered summaries.

Yet, to Ms. Powell’s great disappointment, the appeals court did not throw out the perjury conviction. It said the prosecution “flaw” was not material.

William Hodes, an analyst on legal ethics who assisted in the appeal, found the ruling “crazy.” The judges acknowledged that the prosecutors misled the defense, yet they somehow could predict it would have made no difference at trial.

“The summaries were false,” Mr. Hodes told The Times. “They said things that the witnesses did not say. They themselves yellow-highlighted what they left out of the summaries. It’s astonishing. We should have gotten a new trial.”

Chilling witnesses

When the task force brought indictments in July 2004 against the big cheese in the Enron saga — Kenneth L. Lay, Jeffrey Skilling and Richard Cause — defense attorneys ultimately learned that Mr. Weissmann had done something even more far-reaching. In a sealed court document, he named 114 unindicted co-conspirators, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Defense attorney Kirkendall did some research. He found that it was by far the largest number of such targeted people in the history of federally prosecuted white-collar crime.

The significants: Defendants at trial hoped that some Enron executives would testify on their behalf. But those hopes collapsed on the list of 114.

“Chilling effect, my ass,” said attorney Cogdell. “It was Ice Station Zebra. No one in their right mind would do anything that would upset the task force, specifically Weissmann.”

Mr. Kirkendall believes Mr. Weissmann made the list for that exact reason.

“It was common knowledge in the Houston community,” he told The Times. “If you had a client who was cooperating with defendants in an Enron criminal prosecution, you’d better be careful because they would become a target.”

Mr. Kirkendall knows firsthand. In civil matters, he represented Mr. McMahon, the follow-on chief financial officer at Enron who ended up as one of the 114.

The Merrill Lynch defendants wanted Mr. McMahon to testify. But he planned to take the Fifth Amendment if called because Mr. Weissmann had made it clear on three occasions that he could be indicted.

“We had him ready to post bail and go through the arraignment process because of pressure being applied by the government not to testify for any of the defendants,” he said.

Mr. McMahon never testified. He was never indicted.

The incredulous judge

As he was leaving the task force in July 2005 to accept his first of three stints as an aide to FBI Director Robert MuellerMr. Weissmann announced a new guilty plea.

Christopher Calger, then a 39-year-old former Enron vice president, pleaded guilty in a Houstoncourtroom to fraud. The FBI issued a national press release saying Mr. Calger admitted to making a deal with two businesses that inflated Enron’s earnings. Mr. Calger agreed to become a prosecution witness.

But the announcement did not tell the full story of the hearing that day.

District Court Judge Lynn N. Hughes read the evidence and expressed incredulity that Mr. Calger was pleading guilty.

According to a court transcript, Judge Hughes grilled Linda Lacewell, one of Mr. Weissmann’s prosecutors. He asked her repeatedly to explain what the actual crime was. He said Enron lost no money, there were no bribes and the basic mechanism for the sale of some electric turbines was legal.

Ms. Lacewell said Enron should never have put proceeds on its balance sheets, echoing the 2003 prosecution of Merrill Lynch people in the Nigerian barge transaction.

The judge: “You don’t know the difference between their capital and their current income transaction?”

And he said, “But we do know that this transaction could not have been a tax avoidance scheme, right?”

Ms. Lacewell: “That’s right.”

She then said the plea was to wire fraud, not taxes. To that, Judge Hughes said the task force was trying to criminalize a private transaction to which all parties agreed.

“So you want to convert every default by a corporate officer into a wire fraud case,” he said.

When she explained the deal, the judge replied bluntly, “That’s not wire fraud.”

When she asserted that it was, Judge Hughes lashed out at the task force.

“According to your employer, everything is wire fraud,” he said. “It’s a far cry from what the statute was intended to do when it was adopted.”

But Mr. Calger persisted. He wanted to plead guilty, to which the judge said, “There’s no factual basis for your plea.”

The judge did not know then, but his spot courtroom lecture proved prescient. A year later, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals came to the same conclusion and ruled in the Merrill case that there was no wire fraud.

In 2007, a Houston judge erased Mr. Calger’s conviction. He never testified in an Enron trial.

Attorney Kirkendall said the financial strain of legal bills for years while fighting a powerful government task force played a role in Mr. Calger’s decision to plea.

“The Enron task force’s public relations campaign was far better than its actual prosecutions,” he said.

The task force rattled other potential defense witnesses. But at least one bucked the juggernaut and took the stand as a defense witness in the so-called Enron Broadband Services case.

Mr. Weissmann in 2003 brought charges against executives for ballyhooing the development of internet products to drive up the share price and make an insider stock killing.

At a 2005 trial, engineer Lawrence Ciscon took the stand for the defense. Mr. Ciscon, who had been vice president for software at EBS, said he met with the FBI two times. They never informed him that he was a target. Then he obtained an attorney. The next thing he knew, the task force had labeled him as an unindicted co-conspirator.

As the trial approached and he worked with the defense, prosecutors reminded his attorney of that status.

“They’ve called my lawyer to remind me,” he testified, according to a transcript reviewed by The Times.

He viewed the calls, he said, “as a threat that I could be prosecuted.”

The threats, he said, “made me hesitant” to appear in court. Asked by the defense why he decided to show up in court, he answered, “I have nothing to hide.”

“Regardless of the outcome of this trial, the Enron task force’s ugly tactic of effectively suppressing important testimony of witnesses favorable to Enron defendants has now been fully exposed,” Mr. Kirkendall blogged at the time.

The task force never charged Mr. Ciscon, who went on to a successful technology career.

Today

Justice Department press releases in the 2000s would tout the number 30 as in over 30 people charged in the Enron saga.

But final conviction count is short that number given that appeals courts eviscerated two major cases — Merrill Lynch and Arthur Andersen — while juries acquitted two people and partially acquitted others and two were allowed to withdraw guilty pleas.

In all, 22 pleaded guilty and four trial convictions stuck, according to a Houston Chronicle list.

Afterward, some task force prosecutors rose to significant government posts.

Mr. Weissmann joined Mr. Mueller at the FBI and then arrived at a powerhouse New York law firm as a white-collar-crime defense specialist. He returned to the FBI as Mr. Mueller’s general counsel and, later, was appointed by the Obama administration as chief of Justice’s fraud unit in Washington.

FBI Director Christopher Wray, the Justice Department assistant attorney general who named him task force chief a decade ago, is now supplying Mr. Weissmann with the FBI manpower he needs to pursue TrumpRussia.

Kathryn Ruemmler prosecuted both the Merrill defendants and Lay-Skilling. Years later, she emerged in the prestigious post of White House counsel to President Obama.

Lisa Monaco, another task force prosecutor, stayed at Justice, was Mr. Mueller’s chief of staff and then went to the Obama White House as the president’s top counterterrorism adviser. She joined CNN as an analyst this year.

Whether Mr. Weissmann’s brand — intimidating low-level Mafiosos and corporate figures to force them to snitch — will work in Washington against political operatives will be answered in the coming months.

Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash

Nine months into the Trump administration, any notion that Capitol Hill would provide a comprehensive, authoritative and bipartisan accounting of the extraordinary efforts of a hostile power to disrupt American democracy appears to be dwindling.

“Congressional investigations unfortunately are usually overtly political investigations, where it is to one side’s advantage to drag things out,” said Mr. Gowdy, who made his name in Congress as a fearsome investigator of Democrats. He added, “The notion that one side is playing the part of defense attorney and that the other side is just these white hat defenders of the truth is laughable.”

Instead, he said, he is looking to Robert S. Mueller III, the special counsel, to conduct an apolitical investigation.

None of the challenges have thus far stopped the committees. And given the closed-door nature of their work, prominent new avenues of inquiry could always emerge, such as Russia’s use of social media to sow chaos and discord, capable of influencing the public discourse.

But all three are up against a ticking clock, with Republicans in both chambers eager to wrap up the investigations before too long.

Particularly in the House, partisan fighting is likely to undermine whatever conclusions the committee reaches. One lawmaker said the committee would probably produce two reports. The first, written by Republicans, is expected to forcefully say there is no proof that anyone around Mr. Trump worked with Russia to tip the election. A Democratic report will probably raise unanswered questions and say that the committee was never fully committed to answering them.

The panel has been on rocky ground for months, with much of the controversy surrounding the committee’s chairman, Representative Devin Nunes of California. Mr. Nunes was forced to step asidefrom leading the investigation in April after it was disclosed that he had received classified information from the White House that showed that Mr. Trump and his associates were incidentally swept up in foreign surveillance by American spy agencies.

Mr. Nunes handed control to three of the committee’s Republicans, Representatives K. Michael Conaway of Texas, Tom Rooney of Florida and Mr. Gowdy. Mr. Conaway, a well-liked accountant, helped put the investigation back on track and has maintained a productive relationship with Representative Adam B. Schiff of California, the panel’s top Democrat.

But Democrats say Mr. Nunes, whose signature is required to issue subpoenas, has continued to meddle around the edges of the investigation, driving Republican inquiries into who financed a dossier of unsubstantiated information on purported links between the Trump campaign and Russia. Mr. Nunes, they say, is also participating in an investigation into the revealing of Trump associates caught up in American surveillance by Obama administration officials.

“Frankly, I have been doing everything I can to try to get us to do a credible investigation and to reach a common conclusion,” Mr. Schiff said. “I view these things as obstacles that are in the way to overcome, and I am doing my best to overcome them almost daily.”

A spokesman for Mr. Nunes did not reply to a request for comment.

Democrats were also incensed by Mr. Gowdy’s remarks to Mr. Kushner in July, which they said were representative of efforts by some Republicans to cut the investigation short. Shortly after the meeting, Mr. Schiff publicly accused Mr. Gowdy of playing defense attorney for the administration.

Republicans have returned the biting words, sharply criticizing Mr. Schiff, whose frequent television appearances irk them. Mr. Rooney used a vulgarity when he called Mr. Schiff’s comments about the Kushner interview nonsense. And Mr. Gowdy said on Friday that he had been compelled to weigh in by the Democrats’ repetitive and meandering questions — and that a transcript would show his own questions to have been appropriately aggressive.

The Republican said it had become clear where the committee was headed.

“Will our private conclusions be the same? Yes,” Mr. Gowdy said. “Will our public pronouncements be the same? No, of course not.”

“This is politics,” he added.

Across Capitol Hill, the tone has been different. The chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Richard M. Burr, Republican of North Carolina, and its top Democrat, Mark Warner of Virginia, have worked to project a collaborative rapport that committee members insist is real.

At a rare news conference this month, the two senators said they had already expended significant resources verifying the conclusions of America’s spy agencies about Russia’s efforts to meddle in the election and were now taking steps to better understand its use of social media campaigns and to investigate the collusion question.

“At the end of the day, what we owe the American people is the truth,” Mr. Warner said in an interview on Thursday. “And if there’s something there, then they should know that. And if there’s not something there, I’ll be the first to acknowledge that.”

But other committee members have sought to contain expectations. At the news conference, Mr. Burr said investigators had “hit a wall” in their work on the dossier, which holds some of the most salacious allegations of collusion, because its author, Christopher Steele, would not meet with the committee. Mr. Burr also said he did not have a mandate to look for criminal activity.

“The special counsel is focused on criminal acts; we’re not focused on criminal acts,” he said. “If we find one, then they’re the first phone call we make.”

Senator Dianne Feinstein, Democrat of California and a former chairwoman of the committee, told CBS’s “Face the Nation” this month that Mr. Mueller stood a much better chance of reaching a definitive conclusion about collusion than the committees did.

“There’s no proof yet that it’s happened, and I think that proof will likely come with Mr. Mueller’s investigation,” Ms. Feinstein said. “He’s got the ability to use a grand jury. He’s got the ability to use the power of subpoena without question. And he’s got the ability to do a criminal investigation.”

Both intelligence committees will also face questions about how much of what they find can be declassified and shared with the public. Mr. Burr said on Wednesday that his goal was to have the “meat of our business” done by late spring, in time for state governments to make changes to their voting systems before next year’s midterm elections. He said he would push to declassify the findings as much as possible.

The Judiciary Committee, meanwhile, has struggled to get a fledgling investigation off the ground. Ms. Feinstein, the committee’s top Democrat, and its chairman, Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa, agreed this summer to begin investigating a cluster of topics related to the firing of James B. Comey as F.B.I. director, including Mr. Comey’s handling of the Clinton email case and the Trump campaign’s interactions with Russia.

Given its jurisdiction over the Justice Department, the panel is the best positioned on Capitol Hill to unravel the Comey saga, including possible obstruction of justice. But after a brief flurry of activity earlier this fall — including a closed-door interview with the president’s eldest son, Donald Trump Jr.— investigators reached an impasse in recent weeks, as Democrats and Republicans haggled over the next witnesses to call and documents to request.

Mr. Grassley has spent weeks negotiating with the Justice Department on the committee’s behalf to try to gain access to two key F.B.I. officials who worked closely with Mr. Comey, Carl Ghattas and James Rybicki. Hopes of interviewing Paul J. Manafort, Mr. Trump’s former campaign chairman, collapsed over the summer after prosecutors working for Mr. Mueller warned Mr. Manafort that they planned to seek criminal charges against him.

On Wednesday, Mr. Grassley unilaterally sent a flurry of letters requesting interviews with and information from current and former Justice Department officials, as well as Mr. Kushner and others involved in a June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower between Trump campaign officials and a Russian lawyer said to be offering incriminating information about Mrs. Clinton.

Senators said they were still hopeful that the committee would break through the logjam, but a deal had not been reached as of Friday.

“The American people deserve a public investigation,” said Senator Richard Blumenthal, Democrat of Connecticut, noting that the Judiciary Committee could work more publicly than the intelligence panels. “They deserve witnesses who will give an accounting in public under oath.”

Continue reading the main story

The Early Edition: October 23, 2017

Before the start of business, Just Security provides a curated summary of up-to-the-minute developments at home and abroad. Heres todays news.

SYRIA

The defeat of Islamic State fighters in their de facto capital of Raqqa was a critical breakthrough in the worldwide campaign to defeat the militants and their wicked ideology, President Trump said Saturday, adding that the U.S. efforts would start to enter a new phase entailing support for local security forces, and measures to de-escalate violence across Syria, and advance the conditions for lasting peace. Reuters reports.  

The U.S.-led coalition bombed Raqqa off the face of the earth in their fight against the Islamic State militants, spokesperson for the Russian Defense Ministry Maj. Gen. Igor Konashenkov said yesterday, comparing the scale of the destruction to that of Dresden in 1945 and accusing the West of hurrying to send financial aid to the city to cover up evidence of its crimes. The BBC reports.

The U.S.-backed Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces (S.D.F.) seized Syrias largest oil field from Islamic State militants yesterday, taking al-Omar a key source of revenue for the terrorist group in the Deir al-Zour province, where the S.D.F. and the pro-Syrian government forces are both competing to gain as much territory as possible. Benoit Faucon and Raja Abdulrahim report at the Wall Street Journal.

The S.D.F. are expected to step up efforts to drive out the Islamic State militants from their remaining positions in Deir al-Zour following their successful campaign in Raqqa, the spokesperson for the U.S.-led coalition Col. Ryan Dillon said yesterday, adding that the attack on al-Omar was a surprise assault intended to ensure the militants could not sabotage the oil fields infrastructure. Liz Sly and Zakaria Zakaria report at the Washington Post.

The S.D.F.s capture of the al-Omar oil field brings them closer to pro-government forces across a front line in Deir al-Zour, increasing the potential for a clash between U.S.-backed forces and the Russia- and Iran-backed Syrian army. Anne Barnard reports at the New York Times.

The Islamic State groups oil production has been reduced to less than $4m per month from a peak of approximately $50m per month since the U.S.-led coalition began operations against the militants in 2014, according to a statement by the coalition yesterday. The AP reports.

The reconstruction of Syria offers the chance for allies of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to sign lucrative contracts, particularly Russia and Iran. Bethany Allen-Ebrahimian explains at Foreign Policy.

Iran and its allies have the opportunity to assert control following the defeat of the Islamic State in Raqqa last week and the Trump administration should devise a strategy that ensures the U.S. efforts in Syria are consolidated and not exploited by adversaries.  The Wall Street Journal editorial board writes.

IRAQ

The Iraqi government in Baghdad and the leadership of Iraqs Kurdish Regional Government (K.R.G.) have been engaged in a blame game, pointing to each other for firing the first shots last week in the oil-rich Kirkuk province and placing the U.S. in a difficult position between its two allies. David Zucchino explains at the New York Times.

Last months Iraqi Kurdistan independence referendum has backfired spectacularly, exposing divisions in the Kurdish region and prompting a strong response from the Baghdad government. Loveday Morris explains at the Washington Post.

IRAN

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called on Iranian-backed militia in Iraqs Popular Mobilzation Forces to go home during a meeting with Saudi Arabias King Salman and Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, Tillersons comments provoked an angry reaction from Irans Foreign Minister Javad Zarif. Paul Sonne and Margherita Stancati report at the Wall Street Journal.

No party has the right to interfere in Iraqi matters, a statement by the Iraqi Prime Ministers office said today, pushing back at Tillersons comments about Iranian-backed militia groups and saying that the Popular Mobilization are Iraqi Patriots. Reuters reports.

Tillersons meeting with King Salman and Abadi was part of the Trump administrations efforts to push back against Iranian influence in the region and to encourage greater partnership between Saudi Arabia and Iraq. Matthew Lee reports at the AP.

European firms conduct business with the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (I.R.G.C.) at great risk, Rex Tillerson warned yesterday, sending a strong signal to European allies and others that the Trump administration seeks to reopen negotiations on the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement to include stricter provisions and that re-imposing sanctions against Iran would be a possibility. Gardiner Harris reports at the New York Times.

The Palestinian militant Hamas group would maintain close ties to Iran, the deputy head of Hamas Saleh Aroruri was quoted as saying yesterday by the semi-official Mehr news agency. Reuters reports.

NORTH KOREA

I will pursue decisive and strong diplomacy to tackle North Koreas missile, nuclear and abduction issues, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe vowed today, making the comments after decisively winning re-election yesterday, his victory signaling that Abe would likely continue to work closely with the U.S. and maintain a hard line on Pyongyang. Mari Yamaguchi reports at the AP.

Abe and Trump agreed to work together to raise pressure on North Korea in a phone call, a deputy chief cabinet secretary said today. Reuters reports.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis will discuss the North Korea threat with Asian allies during a week-long trip to region starting today. Phil Stewart reports at Reuters.

The State Department should immediately relist North Korea as a state sponsor of terrorism and correct historical mistakes by acknowledging that the U.S. cannot continue its dealings with Pyongyang based on flawed assumptions. Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) writes at the New York Times.

Former President Jimmy Carter seeks to work with Trump over North Korea, Carter said in an interview with Maureen Dowd at the New York Times, also discussing other issues such as Trumps policies in the Arab world and Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election.

AFGHANISTAN

The C.I.A. is set to expand its role in Afghanistan to combat the Taliban, reflecting a more assertive role since the appointment of Director Mike Pompeo, and the efforts will be led by small counterterrorism pursuit teams. Thomas Gibbons-Neff, Eric Schmitt and Adam Goldman report at the New York Times.

Last weeks series of attacks in Afghanistan killed nearly 200 people, prompting questions about security and the ability of President Ashraf Ghanis administration to prevent the Taliban from carrying out suicide attacks. Antonio Olivo and Sayed Salahuddin report at the Washington Post.

The PHILIPPINES

The fight against Islamic State-linked militants in the southern Philippine city of Marawi has successfully concluded, a spokesperson for Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte said in a statement yesterday, separately the Philippines Defense Secretary added that there were no more militants in the city that was sieged five months ago. Jake Maxwell Watts reports at the Wall Street Journal.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis praised the Philippine army for its victory in Marawi, making the comments to reporters yesterday on the flight for his trip to Southeast Asia. Robert Burns reports at the AP.

TRUMP-RUSSIA INVESTIGATION

Bipartisan politics stands in the way of an effective investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, the three congressional committees looking at the issue have faced significant obstacles, with Republicans keen for the probes to conclude and Democrats keen to explore further questions. Nicholas Fandos explains at the New York Times.

The Trump campaigns digital director Brad Parscale is scheduled to appear before the House Intelligence Committee tomorrow, Julie Bykowicz reports at the Wall Street Journal.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION FOREIGN POLICY

We cannot force talks upon people who are not ready to talk, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said yesterday referring to Saudi Arabia, U.A.E., Egypt and Bahrains isolation of Qatar on June 5 due to Qatars alleged support for terrorism and close ties to Iran adding that he was not hopeful that Saudi Arabia would engage in dialogue to resolve the Gulf crisis. Al Jazeera reports.

The lack of a strategy for U.S. involvement in Middle East and Africa has caused concern in Congress and about the U.S.s long-term counterterrorism goals, Rebecca Kheel reports at the Hill.

Diplomats hope that U.S. ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haleys visit to Ethiopia today would mark greater engagement with Africa. Michelle Nichols reports at Reuters.

Senators were surprised to learn that the U.S. has 1,000 troops in Niger, prompting questions about Congresss role and whether it should have a vote on reauthorizing U.S. military involvement around the world as part of the war against terror. Betsy Woodruff explains at The Daily Beast.

The U.S. military has a presence in almost every country in the world and it is time to consider the deployments and whether there is any strategy that underpins this broad reach. The New York Times editorial board writes.

The top two contenders to replace Secretary of State Rex Tillerson are Nikki Haley and C.I.A. Director Mike Pompeo, Haley would likely by a more traditional and hawkish, whereas Pompeo would be more likely to align himself closer to the White House and the president. Josh Rogin provides an analysis at the Washington Post.

OTHER DEVELOPMENTS

At least 16 Egyptian police officers were killed in an attack by militants on Friday, an initial claim of responsibility by the Islamist Hasm group was discounted by militancy experts and the Islamic State group may have been behind the attack. Declan Walsh and Nour Youssef report at the New York Times.

U.N.-hosted talks on the situation in Libya ended on Saturday with no discernible progress, the second round of talks, which lasted one month, attempted to reconcile the rival Libyan factions. Ulf Lasseing reports at Reuters.

Russian operatives sought access to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and members of her inner circle to gain influence, according to interviews and unsealed F.B.I. records. John Solomon and Alison Spann reveal the Russian campaign at the Hill.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has been pursuing a more aggressive foreign policy but has been facing resistance, particularly from its neighbors. Jane Perlez explains Xis approach at the New York Times.

Read on Just Security »

Christopher Wray – Google News: New FBI Director Touts Importance of Partnerships With Local Police at IACP 2017 – Officer.com (press release) (blog)

New FBI Director Touts Importance of Partnerships With Local Police at IACP 2017
Officer.com (press release) (blog)
FBI Director Christopher Wray spoke at the annual conference of the International Association of Chiefs of Police in Philadelphia Sunday about his goals for the agency and the importance of working hand-in-hand with local law enforcement agencies 

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FBI News Review: 10:12 AM 10/22/2017 FBI: Did Russias Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election?

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james b. comey – Google News: James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty – Newsweek


Newsweek
James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty
Newsweek
O’Keefe lucked out in that Dudich is self-important and dishonest, claiming that former FBI Director James BComey is his godfather and intimating that he may have worked for the FBI. He also calls himself a gatekeeper at the newspaper. O’Keefe 

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The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 12:12 PM 10/22/2017: On Khazarian Mafia

11:23 AM 10/22/2017 What is the Khazarian Mafia (KM)?  Trump Investigations Report Sunday October 22nd, 2017 at 12:10 PM Trump Investigations Report 1 Share What is the Khazarian Mafia (KM)? Khazarian Mafia (KM) against America and many Middle East  Khazarian Mafia has Gone Mad, Follows the French Revolutions Reign of Terror Kashmir Watch Khazarian Mafia … Continue reading“12:12 PM 10/22/2017: On “Khazarian Mafia”…”

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The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 12:29 PM 10/22/2017 All Recent Posts on G+

Posts on G+ from mikenova (2 sites) Public RSS-Feed of Mike Nova. Created with the PIXELMECHANICS ‘GPlusRSS-Webtool’ at http://gplusrss.com: 11:23 AM 10/22/2017 What is the Khazarian Mafia (KM)? 11:23 AM 10/22/2017 What is the Khazarian Mafia (KM)? What is the “Khazarian Mafia (KM)”? “Khazarian Mafia (KM) against America and many Middle East …” – Khazarian … Continue reading“12:29 PM 10/22/2017 – All Recent Posts on G+ “

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The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 1:57 PM 10/22/2017 Graham: Trump Administration Has a Blind Spot on Russia

Saved Stories – None Graham: Trump Administration ‘Has a Blind Spot’ on Russia – NBCNews.com Catalonia, John Kelly, Donald Trump: Your Weekend Briefing – New York Times Trump’s Obsession With His Own Celebrity May Doom His Legacy – NBCNews.com Rep. Maxine Waters says she wants to ‘take out’ Trump – Fox News McConnell says he’s … Continue reading“1:57 PM 10/22/2017 – Graham: Trump Administration ‘Has a Blind Spot’ on Russia”

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mueller – Google News: Trump says he hasn’t been asked to do Mueller interview – CNN


CNN
Trump says he hasn’t been asked to do Mueller interview
CNN
Despite a Politico report suggesting Trump’s legal team may offer Mueller an interview with Trump, the President said he hasn’t been asked. “I don’t know. Nobody’s asked me to do that,” he told Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo on Friday. “There 
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From Mueller and Russia to Kaepernick and the NFL, collusion is …Salon
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Washington Times
Today, Mr. Weissmann stands as special counsel Robert Mueller’s top gun in a squadron of nearly 20 prosecutors and scores of FBI agents delving into Trump-Russia. Mr. Weissmann is leading the probe into the biggest target to date, Paul Manafort, …

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Christopher Wray – Google News: Christopher Wray, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics – Washington Times

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Washington Times
FBI Director Christopher A. Wray was an assistant attorney general in 2004 when he heaped praise on an ambitious Mafia-tested prosecutor while promoting him to the top of the Justice Department’s high-profile Enron task force. Mr. Wrayspecifically 

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Christopher Wray – Google News: FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’ – PennLive.com


PennLive.com
FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’
PennLive.com
FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks at the International Association of Chiefs of Police annual conference Sunday, Oct. 22, 2017, in Philadelphia. Wray said federal agents haven’t been able to retrieve data from more than half of the mobile devices 

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james b. comey – Google News: Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash – New York Times


New York Times
Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash
New York Times
Ms. Feinstein, the committee’s top Democrat, and its chairman, Senator Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa, agreed this summer to begin investigating a cluster of topics related to the firing of James BComey as F.B.I. director, including Mr 

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FBI News Review: 5:45 PM 10/22/2017 FBI directors speech

PennLive.com FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’ PennLive.com In a wide-ranging speech to hundreds of police leaders from across the globe, Wray also touted the FBI’s partnerships with local and federal law enforcement agencies to combat terrorism and violentcrime. “The threats that we face keep accumulating … FBI director’s speech targets … Continue reading“5:45 PM 10/22/2017 – FBI director’s speech”

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5:45 PM 10/22/2017 FBI directors speech

PennLive.com FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’ PennLive.com In a wide-ranging speech to hundreds of police leaders from across the globe, Wray also touted the FBI’s partnerships with local and federal law enforcement agencies to combat terrorism and violentcrime. “The threats that we face keep accumulating … FBI director’s speech targets … Continue reading“5:45 PM 10/22/2017 – FBI director’s speech”
fbi – Google News: FBI watched, then acted as Russian spy moved closer to Hillary Clinton – The Hill


The Hill
FBI watched, then acted as Russian spy moved closer to Hillary Clinton
The Hill
For most of the 10 years, the ring of Russian spies that included Chapman and Murray acted as sleepers, spending a great deal of time collecting information and passing it on to their handlers inside Russia’s SVR spy agency, FBI records state. Murphy …

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TheBlaze.com
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TheBlaze.com
Former FBI Director James Comey sparks 2020 rumors here’s why A Twitter account allegedly belonging to James Comey sparked 2020 interest last week. (Eric Thayer/Getty Images). 0 Follow. Chris Enloe Weekend Editor. Article Goal Inform. Share; Tweet.

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Christopher Wray – Google News: FBI couldn’t access nearly 7K devices because of encryption – Las Vegas Sun

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Las Vegas Sun
PHILADELPHIA The FBI hasn’t been able to retrieve data from more than half of the mobile devices it tried to access in less than a year, FBI Director Christopher Wray said Sunday, turning up the heat on a debate between technology companies and law …

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Christopher Wray – Google News: Wray seeking to bring ‘calm and stability’ to FBI – CNN


CNN
Wray seeking to bring ‘calm and stability’ to FBI
CNN
Wray, who was handpicked by President Donald Trump in June after a month of scandal following the firing of the former FBI director, James Comey, did not mention his predecessor by name or the federal investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 …

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Variety
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Variety
Back in the 1970s, the focus of solving crimes was still very prominently on the who and the what. It was men like John E. Douglas and Robert Ressler, the first FBI criminal profilers on whom the lead characters of Netflix’s Mindhunter are 

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Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
The Early Edition: October 23, 2017
Hopes Dim for Congressional Russia Inquiries as Parties Clash
Andrew Weissmann, Robert Mueller’s top prosecutor, known for hardball tactics
James O’Keefe’s New York Times ‘Investigation’ Is an Exercise in Overwhelming Dishonesty
FBI News Review: 10:12 AM 10/22/2017 FBI: Did Russias Facebook Ads Actually Swing the Election?
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Christopher Wray – Google News: Wray seeks to ‘steady the ship’ at FBI – The Hill
mueller – Google News: Senate Probe Asks Whether Robert Mueller Alerted Obama Administration to Russian Bribery Scheme – Breitbart News
The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: 3:04 AM 10/23/2017 Donald Trump Attacks Mainstream Media While Downplaying Russian Election Ads on Facebook Newsweek
FBI News Review: 3:05 AM 10/23/2017 FBI couldnt access nearly 7K devices because of encryption Washington Post
3:05 AM 10/23/2017 FBI couldnt access nearly 7K devices because of encryption Washington Post
The World Wide Times wwtimes.com: FBI cannot be trusted Washington Times
mueller – Google News: Mueller Now Investigating Democratic Lobbyist Tony Podesta – NBCNews.com
fbi – Google News: FBI agent reveals life infiltrating extremist groups in America – BBC News
FBI Severely Underreported How Many Times It Authorised Informants To Break The Law
fbi statistics underreporting of crimes by informants – Google Search
fbi statistics – Google Search
Russia’s Election Hackers Use DC Cyber Warfare Conference as Bait – Daily Beast
Donald Trump unleashes reckless, bizarre, traitorous Trump-Russia endgame
Donald Trump Jr goes off the delusional deep end as his father goes down in flames
FBI couldn’t access nearly 7K devices because of encryption – Washington Post
FBI director’s speech targets mobile devices, access: ‘This is a huge, huge problem’
Lindsey Graham: The Trump administration has ‘a blind spot on Russia I still can’t figure out’ – Business Insider

 

Mike Nova’s Shared NewsLinks
The Early Edition: October 23, 2017

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