At CIA, a watchful eye on Mike Pompeo, the president’s ardent ally – The Washington Post

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Source: At CIA, a watchful eye on Mike Pompeo, the president’s ardent ally – The Washington Post

At CIA, a watchful eye on Mike Pompeo, the president’s ardent ally

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As CIA director, Mike Pompeo has taken a special interest in an agency unit that is closely tied to the investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign, requiring the Counterintelligence Mission Center to report directly to him.

Officials at the center have, in turn, kept a watchful eye on Pompeo, who has repeatedly played down Russia’s interference in the 2016 election and demonstrated a willingness to engage in political skirmishes for President Trump.

Current and former officials said that the arrangement has been a source of apprehension among the CIA’s upper ranks and that they could not recall a time in the agency’s history when a director faced a comparable conflict.

“Pompeo is in a delicate situation unlike any other director has faced, certainly in my memory,” said Rolf Mowatt-Larssen, a CIA official for 23 years who served in Russia and held high-level positions at headquarters, “because of his duty to protect and provide the truth to an independent investigation while maintaining his role with the president.”

[Obama’s secret struggle to punish Russia for Putin’s election assault]

Trump, Russia and the opposition research firm run by ex-journalists

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What is Fusion GPS and did it receive Russian government funds as it investigated Donald Trump?What is Fusion GPS and did it receive Russian government funds as it investigated Donald Trump?(Video: Meg Kelly/Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

What is Fusion GPS and did it receive Russian government funds as it investigated Donald Trump? (Meg Kelly/The Washington Post)

The Russia issue has complicated Pompeo’s effort to manage a badly strained relationship between the agency and a president who has disparaged its work and compared U.S. intelligence officials to Nazis. Amid that tension, Pompeo’s interactions with the counterintelligence center have come under particular scrutiny.

The unit helped trigger the investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia by serving as a conduit to the FBI last year for information the CIA developed on contacts between Russian individuals and Trump campaign associates, officials said.

The center works more closely with the FBI than almost any other CIA department does, officials said, and continues to pursue leads on Moscow’s election interference operation that could factor in the probe led by special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, a former FBI director.

Pompeo has not impeded that work, officials said. But several officials said there is concern about what he might do if the CIA uncovered new information potentially damaging to Trump and Pompeo were forced to choose between protecting the agency or the president.

“People have to watch him,” said a U.S. official who, like others, requested anonymity to speak frankly. “It’s almost as if he can’t resist the impulse to be political.”

A second former CIA official cited a “real concern for interference and politicization,” saying that the worry among some at the agency is “that if you were passing on something too dicey [to Pompeo] he would go to the White House with it.”

Pompeo has attributed his direct supervision of the counterintelligence center to a desire to place a greater emphasis on preventing leaks and protecting classified secrets — core missions of the center that are also top priorities for Trump.

Trump on Russia investigation: ‘They’re trying to cheat you out of the future and the future that you want’

President Trump dismissed allegations of collusion between his campaign and Russia at a rally in Huntington, W. Va., on Aug. 3. President Trump dismissed allegations of collusion between his campaign and Russia at a rally in Huntington, W. Va., on Aug. 3. (The Washington Post)

President Trump dismissed allegations of collusion between his campaign and Russia at a rally in Huntington, W. Va., on Aug. 3. (The Washington Post)

Having the center report to him was designed “to send a signal to the workforce that this was important and we weren’t going to tolerate misbehavior,” he said at a security conference in Aspen, Colo., last month.

CIA spokesman Ryan Trapani described the suggestion that Pompeo might abuse his position as “ridiculous.”

Executive-order guidelines prohibit the CIA from passing information to the White House “for the purpose of affecting the political process in the United States,” Trapani said. “The FBI and special counsel’s office are leading the law enforcement investigation into this matter — not CIA. CIA is providing relevant information in support of that investigation, and neither the director nor CIA will interfere with it.”

Pompeo, 53, arrived as director at the CIA just days after Trump delivered a self-aggrandizing post-inaugural speech at agency headquarters. Appearing before a wall of carved granite stars that commemorate CIA officers killed in the line of duty, Trump used the occasion to browbeat the media and make false claims about the size of his inauguration crowds.

Pompeo has worked to overcome that inauspicious start, winning over many in the CIA workforce with his vocal support for aggressive intelligence gathering, his command of complex global issues and his influence at the White House. Pompeo spends several hours there almost every day, according to officials who said he has developed a strong rapport with the president.

But Pompeo is also known for berating subordinates, aggressively challenging agency analysts and displaying the fierce partisanship that became his signature while serving as a GOP member of Congress.

When asked about Russian election interference, Pompeo often becomes testy and recites talking points that seem designed to appease a president who rejects the allegations as “fake news” conjured by Democrats to delegitimize his election win.

“It is true” that Russia interfered in the 2016 election, Pompeo said at Aspen, “and the one before that, and the one before that . . . ”

The phrasing, which Pompeo has repeated in other settings, casts last year’s events as an unremarkable continuation of a long-standing pattern, rather than the unprecedented Kremlin operation described in a consensus report that the CIA and other agencies released in January.

Russia’s intervention in 2016 represented “a significant escalation in directness, level of activity, and scope of effort,” the report concluded. Its goal went beyond seeking to discredit U.S. democratic processes, the report said, and in the end was aimed at trying “to help President-elect Trump’s election chances.”

Pompeo has taken more hawkish positions on other areas of tension with Russia, saying that Moscow intervened in Syria, for example, in part because “they love to stick it to America.”

Almost all CIA directors have had to find ways to manage a supposedly apolitical spy agency while meeting the demands of a president. But Trump, who has fired his FBI chief and lashed out at his attorney general over the Russia probe, appears to expect a particularly personal brand of loyalty.

“It is always a balancing act between a director’s access to the president and the need to protect CIA’s sensitive equities,” said John Sipher, a former senior CIA official who also served in Russia. “Pompeo clearly has a more difficult challenge in maintaining that balance than his predecessors given the obvious concerns with this president’s unique personality, obsession with charges against him, lack of knowledge and tendency to take impulsive action.”

Pompeo has shown a willingness to handle political assignments for the White House. Earlier this year, he and other officials were enlisted to make calls to news organizations — speaking on the condition of anonymity — to dispute a New York Times article about contacts between Russians and individuals tied to the Trump campaign. Pompeo has never publicly acknowledged his involvement in that effort.

He has also declined to address whether he was approached by Trump earlier this year — as other top intelligence officials were — to publicly deny the existence of any evidence of collusion with Russia or to intervene with then-FBI Director James B. Comey to urge the FBI to back off its investigation of former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Pompeo has, by all accounts, a closer relationship with Trump than others who did field such requests, including Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats and National Security Agency Director Mike Rogers.

Pompeo was exposed to Trump’s wrath over the Russia investigation on at least one occasion, officials said. He was among those present for a meeting at the White House earlier this year when Trump began complaining about the probe and, in front of Pompeo and others, asked what could be done about it.

Trapani, the CIA spokesman, declined to address the matter or say whether Pompeo has been questioned about it by Mueller. Pompeo’s conversations with Trump “are entitled to confidentiality,” Trapani said, adding that “the director has never been asked by the president to do anything inappropriate.”

Pompeo spends more time at the White House than his recent CIA predecessors and is seen as more willing to engage in policy battles. In interviews and public appearances, Pompeo has advocated ousting the totalitarian regime in North Korea, accused the Obama administration of “inviting” Russia into Syria and criticized the nuclear accord with Iran.

Pompeo has also come under scrutiny on social issues. As part of an effort to expand chaplain services to CIA employees — which Trapani said was in response to requests from the agency workforce — Pompeo has consulted with Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, an organization that the Southern Poverty Law Center has labeled an anti-gay hate group. Perkins has described that characterization as “reckless.”

When Trump came under criticism for failing to specifically condemn Nazi sympathizers taking part in protests in Charlottesville — instead lamenting violence by “many sides” — Pompeo defended the president in a CBS interview, saying that Trump’s condemnation of bigotry was “frankly pretty unambiguous.”

Pompeo inherited an agency that had undergone a major reorganization under his predecessor, combing analysts and operators in a constellation of “centers” responsible for geographic regions, as well as transnational issues such as terrorism.

Pompeo’s alterations have been minimal. He added two centers — one devoted to North Korea and the other to Iran. All but the counterintelligence unit fall under Pompeo’s deputy on the CIA organizational chart.

Pompeo, who met with Russian intelligence officials in Moscow in May, would have been entitled to full briefings from the counterintelligence center even without making that bureaucratic tweak. But asserting more control of the unit responsible for preventing leaks probably pleased Trump, who has accused U.S. spy agencies of engaging in a smear campaign to undermine his presidency.

U.S. intelligence officials have disputed that spy agencies are behind such leaks but acknowledge broader concerns about security issues, pointing to episodes including the CIA’s loss of a vast portion of its hacking arsenal, which was obtained this year by the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks.

A descendant of the unit led by legendary CIA mole-hunter James Jesus Angleton, the counterintelligence center is run by a veteran female CIA officer who has served extensively overseas in Europe, East Asia and Russia. She was also one of the main authors of the CIA’s internal review of a deadly suicide bombing that killed seven agency employees in Khost, Afghanistan, in 2009.

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“I think she’s wary about the administration,” said a former colleague who also described her as “someone who would not fall in line” if she suspected interference in the center’s role. Preventing the center from sharing information with the bureau would be difficult — an FBI official serves as head of the center’s counterespionage unit.

Last year, the center played an important part in detecting Russian efforts to cultivate associates of the Trump campaign. Former CIA director John Brennan testified in May that he became “worried by a number of the contacts that the Russians had with U.S. persons” and alerted the FBI.

The center has since been enlisted to help answer questions about key moments in the timeline of Trump-Russia contacts, officials said, possibly including the meeting that Donald Trump Jr. held in June with a Russian lawyer.

“Who sent her on the mission — was it Russian intelligence or on her own initiative?” a former official said, referring to the lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. “Mueller can’t do anything on that without the agency.”

Julie Tate, Adam Entous and Carol D. Leonnig contributed to this report.

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CIA Staff Reportedly Worried About Pompeo As FBI Pursues Russia Probe – Talking Points Memo

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Subscribe to TPM Prime for a better reading experience, exclusive features and to support our reporters’ award-winning journalism.

As the federal investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 election moves forward under special counsel Robert Mueller, some staff members at the CIA are concerned about Director Mike Pompeo’s role overseeing the CIA subdivision working most closely with the FBI, according to a Thursday evening report in the Washington Post.


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Damnatio memoriae: No further news transpired on Peter Strzok’s departure from the Mueller’s Investigative team, and no explanations or additional information were provided so far. The mystery is deep… – M.N. – peter strzok – Google Search

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Image result for damnatio memoriae

No further news transpired on Peter Strzok’s departure from the Mueller’s Investigative team, and no explanations or additional information were provided so far. The mystery is deep… Curiously enough, it looks like the FBI site blocked all the information about him. Apparently, it was needed. That what they advised:

“No results found. Search instead for:

All these are very interesting search terms, but we would really like to learn more about Mr. Strzok. 

In history, this FBI’s tool of blocking the inconvenient information was called the “damnatio memoriae” and was used without any compunctions and broadly in Stalin’s Russia and Hitler’s Germany. The American idiom for this psychological device is quite straightforward but somewhat superficial and concrete: “Out of sight (and the website, we should add), out of mind”. I doubt very much that this dictum will work sufficiently in the case of Mr. Strzok and the panoply of the related issues connected with him. 

Dear FBI, the suspense and the expectations of the future revelations in your coming arias are quite high in this unforgettable masterpiece of a political opera. Sing! Sing! Sing!

What is going on? 

Is FBI the Stalinist organization? (Sh, sh, sh – do not disclose this best-kept secret in Washington, D.C.)

Please, contact us if you have any valuable information on this subject. 

M.N.

Source: peter strzok – Google Search

Story image for peter strzok from Business Insider

A top FBI investigator has unexpectedly stepped away from special …

Business InsiderAug 16, 2017
Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear …
The following article describes Mr. Strzok’s role in “Clinton emails investigation”: 
“The two letters, dated October 23, 2015 and January 20, 2016, and marked “For Official Use Only,” were written by Peter Strzok and Charles H. Kable IV, the section chiefs of the FBI’s counterespionage section, and sent to Gregory B. Starr, the assistant secretary at the State Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security. They were written while the FBI was investigating Clinton’s use of an unsecure, private email server and the dissemination of classified information.”
M.N.: The issue of Clinton’s emails might very well has been used as a distraction, to deflect the attention and to divert the resources from Trump and his campaign. By whom? The role of the Russians is very well known and indisputable, but the ultimate players: the Germans? the Israelis? the Mafia? – remain a mystery also, and the most intriguing one. 
Were there any connections between these hypothetical players and Mr. Strzok? This is the hypothetical but not the unreasonable question, and we do not have any answers, or even the attempts to answer, or even the attention and the willingness to discuss this subject in depth, that it deserves, in the mainstream media. Not yet. 

peter strzok is removed – Google News

 

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Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation – Review of news and recent posts

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Image result for Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation

Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation – GS

Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation  

4 reasons why many Northeast Philly Russians still support Trump | Commentary
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Anthony Weiner was the first The hypothesis: Anthony Weiner was the first to talk about Trump and Russia. Anthony Weiners sexting case was a sting operation by FBI and others to tarnish Mrs. Clinton by association, it led to October 28 Letter and benefited Trump.
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Top Navy admiral orders fleetwide investigation following latest collision at sea The Washington Post
The Failing Trump Presidency The New York Times

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Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation – Google Search

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Source: Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation – Google Search

Story image for Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation from Newsweek

Lovers’ Quarrel: TrumpPutin and the World’s Most Dangerous …

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October 3, 2016: Netanyahu tasks deep cover Mossad agent …

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What happened? What happened?! You blew it, Hillary.

The Week MagazineJul 29, 2017
The point isn’t that Comey and Putin and unsavory political views played no role. … that he was reopening the investigation into Clinton’s email server, … Trumpcampaign collusion) hadn’t broken into John Podesta’s email …

Story image for Trump, Putin, and Reopening of Emails Investigation from IVN News

From Russia Meddling to DNC Incompetence: Where We Are and …

IVN NewsAug 11, 2017
I just finished reading “TrumpPutin, and The New Cold War” that … saying the bureau was reopening its investigation into Ms. Clinton’s emails, …

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 Sentencing of Disgraced Former  Congressman Anthony Weiner Postponed

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Source:  Sentencing of Disgraced Former  Congressman Anthony Weiner Postponed

Sentencing of Disgraced Former  Congressman Anthony Weiner Postponed

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The sentencing of Anthony Weiner, the 52-year-old former NYC Congressman who fell from grace after a much-publicized sexting scandal, was postponed last Friday by a Manhattan judge.

According to a NY Post report, Weiner’s sentencing was delayed at the request of his lawyers, who asked that federal Judge Denise Cole postpone their client’s sentencing until Oct. 6. Cole partially complied, holding the sentencing (initially scheduled for September 8) off until September 25.

On May 19, Weiner confessed to sending obscene material to a teenage girl, a scandal which ruined his career, reputation, and marriage to his wife Huma Abedin, who filed for divorce following Weiner’s admission of guilt.

In a report, News 12 Westchester said Weiner’s legal team have stated they need additional time to prepare a sentencing recommendation that suits Weiner’s ongoing treatment.

In addition to his legal woes, Weiner is currently paying a heavy price for his actions in other ways.

“Nobody speaks to him. He is truly ostracized,” a source cited by Page <a href=”http://Six.com” rel=”nofollow”>Six.com</a> said. “People won’t even get on the elevator with him.”

In his confession earlier this year, Weiner expressed contrition for his actions, saying he had no excuse for his behavior.

“I have a sickness, but I do not have an excuse,” he said during a May appearance in Federal Court. “I apologize to everyone I have hurt. I apologize to the teenage girl, whom I mistreated so badly.”

In an emotional plea statement in May, Weiner acknowledged that his “destructive impulses brought great devastation to family and friends, and destroyed my life’s dream of public service. And yet I remained in denial even as the world around me fell apart.”

According to a Washington Post report at the time, Weiner’s attorney, Arlo Devlin-Brown, said his client had “apologized, offered no excuses, and made a commitment to make amends.”

Devlin-Brown also said he believed Weiner had accepted “full responsibility for the inappropriate, sexually explicit communications he engaged in early last year.”

Weiner resigned in 2011 after sending an explicit photo to a minor via Twitter (usingh his Twitter account accidentally). Weiner also confessed to engaging in similar behavior with at least six other women, a fact he confessed to in 2011.

By: Yosef Delatitsky


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Mueller Uses Classic Prosecution Playbook Despite Trump Warnings

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The former FBI director leading the probe into the Trump campaign’s possible ties to Russia is taking a page from the playbook federal prosecutors have used for decades in criminal investigations, from white-collar fraud to mob racketeering:Follow the money.

Source: Mueller Uses Classic Prosecution Playbook Despite Trump Warnings

“The July raid on the home of Manafort, whose financial dealings and previous work for a Russian-backed party in Ukraine have come under scrutiny, was seen as an effort to get him to give up any damaging information he might have on Trump or others.

Manafort changed lawyers after the raid, announcing he would hire Miller & Chevalier, which specializes in international tax law and fraud. The move was made because Mueller’s investigation of Manafort appears to be moving beyond collusion with Russia to focus on potential tax violations, said a person familiar with the matter.

John Dowd, another Trump lawyer, called the raid a “gross abuse of the judicial process” for the sake of “shock value”

— another indication that the Trump team is chafing increasingly at Mueller’s hard-charging approach.”

Mueller Uses Classic Prosecution Playbook Despite Trump Warnings

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The former FBI director leading the probe into the Trump campaign’s possible ties to Russia is taking a page from the playbook federal prosecutors have used for decades in criminal investigations, from white-collar fraud to mob racketeering:

Follow the money. Start small and work up. See who will “flip” and testify against higher-ups by pursuing charges such as tax evasion, money laundering, conspiracy and obstruction of justice.

Special counsel Robert Mueller — himself a veteran prosecutor — has assembled a team of 16 lawyers experienced in complex criminal cases for his investigation into Russian meddling in last year’s presidential campaign.

They even staged a dramatic early morning raid in late July on the home of President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort — a classic shock-and-awe tactic reminiscent of raids the FBI used against four hedge funds in an insider-trading probe in 2010 and earlier against mobsters like John Gotti, head of the Gambino crime family in New York.

“You’re always looking for people on the inside to testify about what goes on,” said Jeffrey Cramer, a former prosecutor who’s now managing director of consulting firm Berkeley Research Group LLC. “You go for the weakest link, and you start building up.”

Trump’s Red Line

Mueller was given a broad mandate in May by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein to investigate not only Russia’s interference and potential collusion with Trump’s presidential campaign but also “any matters that arose or may arise directly from the investigation.”

Now, the expanding investigation risks a showdown with Trump, who has warned that looking into his family’s real estate deals would cross a red line.

While Trump’s legal team doesn’t anticipate that Mueller will violate his mandate, it’s prepared to take action if he does, Jay Sekulow, one of Trump’s lawyers, said in an interview. Matters that would be out of bounds include looking at Trump’s taxes or real-estate transactions of the president or his family members, Sekulow said.

“If we felt there was an issue that developed that was outside the scope of legitimate inquiry we would, in normal course, file our objections with the special counsel,” Sekulow said. “If we weren’t satisfied with the resolution we would look at going through the appropriate channels at the Department of Justice.”

People ‘Speculating’

Sekulow also said it’s “fundamentally incorrect” to assume that Mueller is conducting a mob-style investigation when it comes to Trump and his family members, at least based on what he’s seen to date.

“People are speculating on things without a full grasp of the nature of what’s taking place,” he said.

Rosenstein said on “Fox News Sunday” this month that “we don’t engage in fishing expeditions” and Mueller needs to come to him for approval to investigate any potential crimes beyond his mandate. Mueller and Rosenstein declined to comment for this story, according to their aides.

Those who have worked with Mueller said he knows how to build a case piece-by-piece.

“Mueller is no dummy,” said William Mateja, a former federal prosecutor who investigated white-collar crime and served at the Justice Department when Mueller was director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. “You use crimes like money laundering and tax evasion to get cooperation from people who might be in the know.”

Among the experienced prosecutors he’s recruited in that effort is Andrew Weissmann, who worked in the 1990s to dismantle crime families on racketeering charges. He squeezed lower-level mobsters to become cooperating witnesses, a tactic that eventually led to the conviction of Genovese crime boss Vincent “The Chin” Gigante for racketeering in 1997. Later, Weissmann led the Enron Task Force that investigated and prosecute cases involving the defunct Houston energy trader.

Greg Andres, another team member, is a former deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department’s criminal division who took down Bonanno family boss Joseph Massino. He also prosecuted former Credit Suisse Group AG broker Eric Butler for securities fraud. Butler was convicted in 2009.

To be sure, Mueller’s team is using 21st century technology to investigate last year’s hacking into Democratic Party computers and moves to “weaponize” social media to influence voters.

But it’s also using time-tested methods, casting a wide net to find out “who are the true power players” with knowledge of what was happening in Trump’s campaign and during his transition to the White House, said Ronald Hosko, former assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division.

“The core part of Robert Mueller’s mission is to understand whether people associated with the campaign were associated with Russians determined to influence the election results,” said Hosko, who’s now president of the Law Enforcement Legal Defense Fund.

Trump Buildings

The investigation is examining Russian purchases of apartments in Trump buildings, Trump’s involvement in a controversial New York hotel development with Russian associates and Trump’s sale of a Florida mansion to a Russian oligarch in 2008, Bloomberg News reported last month. Sekulow said he hasn’t seen any evidence the investigation is looking into Trump’s real-estate transactions.

Trump associates who are central figures in Mueller’s investigation include Manafort, the president’s son-in-law Jared Kushner, and Michael Flynn, who was ousted as national security adviser, according to two U.S. officials with knowledge of the investigation. Mueller is now in talks with the White House to interview current and former administration officials, including recently departed White House chief of staff Reince Priebus, the New York Times reported.

“They’re looking at where are various people getting money from, and they’re going to try to figure out not only where did it come from, but who can they connect it to,” said Mateja, now a shareholder at the law firm of Polsinelli PC. “Can they connect it to Donald Trump?”

What’s not known publicly yet is whether any of those under investigation are cooperating to help Mueller build a case, Hosko said.

Pressure to Act

Mueller’s investigation is likely to continue through next year if not longer, increasing pressure on him to announce indictments against those who committed relatively small offenses and who aren’t needed to further the investigation, according to Hosko.

“The longer it drags out, the louder the complaints will get that there’s nothing that’s been proven,” he said.

The July raid on the home of Manafort, whose financial dealings and previous work for a Russian-backed party in Ukraine have come under scrutiny, was seen as an effort to get him to give up any damaging information he might have on Trump or others.

Manafort changed lawyers after the raid, announcing he would hire Miller & Chevalier, which specializes in international tax law and fraud. The move was made because Mueller’s investigation of Manafort appears to be moving beyond collusion with Russia to focus on potential tax violations, said a person familiar with the matter.

John Dowd, another Trump lawyer, called the raid a “gross abuse of the judicial process” for the sake of “shock value” — another indication that the Trump team is chafing increasingly at Mueller’s hard-charging approach.

© Copyright 2017 Bloomberg News. All rights reserved.

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The Art of the Steal: Trump Illegitimacy Is Glaring


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Peter Strzok

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A top FBI investigator has unexpectedly stepped away from special … Business Insider-Aug 16, 2017 Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear … High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe The Hill-Aug 16, 2017 Report: Ex-FBI Counterespionage Chief Leaves Mueller’s Russia … TPM-Aug 16, 2017 Report: Investigator Leaves Mueller’s Russia Probe Daily Beast-Aug 16, 2017 Senior FBI Official Who Investigate

Source: Peter Strzok – Google Search

Peter Strzok Google Search
Top FBI investigator Peter Strzok steps away from Russia probe Business Insider | Peter Strzok: It is unclear why Peter Strzok decided to leave. Investigator Reportedly Leaves Muellers Russia Probe.Peter Strzok worked on the FBI probe into Hillary 
Staff change on Muellers Trump Russia team raises questions | MSNBC
Muellers Russia probe: Nothing is unrelated now CNN
White House lawyer Cobb predicts quick end to Mueller probe
ANTHONY WEINER WAS THE FIRST BY MICHAEL NOVAKHOV | TRUMP CURRENT NEWS
ANTHONY WEINER WAS THE FIRST BY MICHAEL NOVAKHOV | TRUMP CURRENT NEWS HTTP://WWTIMES.COM/  | HTTP://TRUMPINVESTIGATIONS.ORG/ 

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Top FBI investigator Peter Strzok is removed from the Mueller’s Trump-Russia probe…

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Top FBI investigator Peter Strzok steps away from Russia probe – Business Insider | Peter Strzok: It is unclear why Peter Strzok decided to leave. Investigator Reportedly Leaves Mueller’s Russia Probe.Peter Strzok worked on the FBI probe into Hillary …

The Web World Times
Peter Strzok Google Search
Sun, 20 Aug 2017 17:03:14 +0000
A top FBI investigator has unexpectedly stepped away from special … Business Insider-Aug 16, 2017 Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear … High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe The Hill-Aug 16, 2017 Report: Ex-FBI Counterespionage Chief Leaves Mueller’s Russia … TPM-Aug … Continue reading“Peter Strzok – Google Search”The post Peter Strzok – Google Search appeared first on The Web World Times.

Special counsel’s Russia probe loses top FBI investigator – ABC News

abcnews.go.com/Politics/special-counsels-russia-probe-loses-top-fbi…/story?id…

4 days ago – The recent departure of the FBI veteran, Peter Strzok, is the first known hitch in a secretive probe that, by all public accounts, is charging full …

High-ranking FBI official leaves Russia probe | TheHill

thehill.com/policy/national…/346836-high-ranking-fbi-official-leaves-russia-probe

4 days ago – Peter Strzok has left the probe for reasons that are not yet known.

Report: Ex-FBI Counterespionage Chief Leaves Mueller’s Russia …

talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/peter-strzok-mueller-team-departure

4 days ago – Peter Strzok, previously the head of the FBI’s counterespionage section, left Mueller’s team and is working in the FBI’s human resources …

A top FBI investigator has unexpectedly stepped away from special …

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/08/16/top-fbi…stepped…/23079781/

4 days ago – Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear …

FBI Investigator Who Led Hillary Email Case Suddenly Resigns From …

www.zerohedge.com/…/high-ranking-fbi-official-who-led-hillary-email-case-suddenl…

4 days ago – After being appointed to Special Counsel Mueller’s team just over a month ago, ABC is now reporting that Peter Strzok, the FBI agent who …

Report: Investigator Leaves Mueller’s Russia Probe – The Daily Beast

www.thedailybeast.com/report-investigator-leaves-muellers-russia-probe

4 days ago – Peter Strzok worked on the FBI probe into Hillary Clinton’s email server.

The Daily Beast – It is unclear why Peter Strzok decided… | Facebook

https://www.facebook.com/thedailybeast/posts/10155765179569203

It is unclear why Peter Strzok decided to leave. Investigator Reportedly Leaves Mueller’s Russia Probe.Peter Strzok worked on the FBI probe into Hillary …

An FBI investigator and former army officer hired by Robert Mueller to examine Russian election interference has unexpectedly stepped away from the probe.

Source: Top FBI investigator Peter Strzok steps away from Russia probe – Business Insider

Top FBI investigator Peter Strzok steps away from Russia probe

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A highly experienced FBI investigator and former army officer hired by special counsel Robert Mueller to examine Russia’s interference in the 2016 election has unexpectedly stepped away from the probe, ABC News reported on Wednesday.

Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear why he stepped aside, or if he did so voluntarily.

Asha Rangappa, a former FBI counterintelligence agent and associate dean at Yale Law School, said that she had “never heard of an agent being moved to the human resources department.”

“I have seen instances where if some issue comes up, the agent might be moved to another investigation or to the operations center, where you essentially field calls all day,” Rangappa said. “But why he would be moved to HR is just bizarre.”

Rangappa did not want to speculate on what may have happened in Strzok’s case, but said there were many factors — ranging from small administrative violations to more significant incidents — that could raise questions about an agent’s ability to stay on a case.

A former FBI agent who worked with Strzok on and off over several years in the bureau’s counterintelligence division said that Strzok’s move to HR means he has now been separated from counterintelligence work altogether.

The FBI sometimes parks agents in the human resources department, the agent explained, when they need to be reassigned quickly away from substantive matters and there’s no other place to put them. Christopher Wray, who was confirmed as the new FBI director two weeks ago, would have played a role in reassigning Strzok.

Strzok headed the FBI’s counterespionage division last year and was one of the top officials overseeing the criminal investigation into whether Hillary Clinton mishandled classified information while she was secretary of state. He had previously worked on some of the “most secretive investigations in recent years involving Russian and Chinese espionage,” according to the New York Times.

Rangappa noted that the DOJ’s Office of the Inspector General (OIG) opened an investigation in January into the FBI’s handling of the email probe, including former FBI Director James Comey’s decision to announce a new inquiry into her email server 11 days before the election. It is not clear whether Strzok, who supervised elements of the email probe, was caught up in the OIG investigation.

The OIG declined to comment. But their website lists the probe as ongoing.

Strzok’s departure also came one week after The Washington Post reported that Mueller had obtained a search warrant to raid the home of President Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort. The Post report cited “people familiar with the search,” prompting questions about whether anyone on Mueller’s team had leaked the existence of the search warrant to the Post.

Mueller has assembled two-dozen investigators and lawyers to help him examine Russia’s election interference and whether Trump’s campaign colluded with Moscow to undermine Clinton. The former FBI director impaneled a grand jury in late July that quickly issued subpoenas related to the June 2016 meeting between Trump’s eldest son and a Russian lawyer with connections to the Kremlin.

Story image for Peter Strzok from Business Insider

A top FBI investigator has unexpectedly stepped away from special …

Business InsiderAug 16, 2017
Peter Strzok, a veteran counterintelligence investigator, is now working for the FBI’s human resources division, according to ABC. It is unclear …

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